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As part of the on-boarding of UMaT on Baker Hughes General Electric (BHGE) Oil and Gas Learning and Development Programme, BHGE is offering brilliant-but-needy Ghanaian UMaT-students annual scholarships over their study period with effect from the 2018/2019 academic year.

This is one of the many scholarships enjoyed by UMaT students over the years from organisations such as Ghana National Petroleum Corporation, Total Ghana Ltd, Kufuor Foundation, Gold Fields Ghana Ltd., Anglogold Ashanti, Maxam Ghana Ltd., Metso Minerals, Barclays, etc.

The BHGE Scholarship will support fifteen (15) BSc students and four (4) MSc/MPhil students, with costs relating to Academic Facility User Fees, Residential Facility User Fees, Research Fees and Stipend.

Important Information and Timelines for Interested Applicants:

  • An eligible applicant must be a Ghanaian student of UMaT for at least one academic year, maintain a minimum Cumulative Weighted Average (CWA) of 75%, be of good conduct as stipulated in the UMaT students’ guide and have a proof of Pressing Financial Need.
  • Applicants on other scholarship packages are NOT eligible.
  • Application forms will be made available online to prospective applicants until 12th July, 2018.
  • Selection interviews will be conducted for shortlisted applicants from 18th to 20th July, 2018.
  • Final selection will be completed by 31st July, 2018.
  • Selected applicants will be informed with award letter from BHGE by the middle of August, 2018.
  • BSc Awardees will enjoy a maximum amount of GHC 6,300.00 per year.
  • MSc/MPhil Awardees will enjoy a maximum of GHC 10,000.00 per year.
  • Awardees will enjoy the scholarship from 2018/2019 academic year until the end of their programme, provided they remain in good standing with the eligibility criteria.
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 UNIVERSITY OF MINES AND TECHNOLOGY, TARKWA
  SEMESTER DATES – 2019/2020 ACADEMIC YEAR

   FIRST SEMESTER – 161/2 WEEKS

 

 Arrival of Continuing Students  -  Saturday, August 17, 2019
Registration of Continuing Students  -  Monday, August 19, 2019, - Wednesday, August 21, 2019
Lectures Begin for Continuing Students  -  Thursday, August 22, 2019
Late Registration with Fine  -  Thursday, August 22, 2019 - Friday, August 30, 2019
Registration of Continuing Students Closes  -  Friday, August 30, 2019
Arrival of Fresh students  -  Monday, September 2, 2019
Registration/Orientation/Medical Examination of Fresh Students  -  Tuesday September 3, 2019 – Friday September 6, 2019

Deadline for Departments to submit Lists of Registered Students by Courses to AcademicAffairs Unit (Continuing Students)

Friday, September 6, 2019
Lectures for fresh students begin  -  Monday September 9, 2019
Matriculation  -  Saturday, October 12, 2019

Deadline for Departments to submit Lists of Registered Students by Courses to Academic Affairs Unit (First-Year Students)          

 Friday, November 1, 2019
Assessment of Course Delivery  -

Monday, November 4, 2019 - Friday, November 15, 2019

First Semester Examinations  - Monday, November 25, 2019 - Friday, December 13, 2019
Students Depart  -  Saturday, December 14, 2019

   SEMESTER VACATION FOR STUDENTS – 5 WEEKS

 

Semester Vacation  -  Saturday, December 14, 2019 –Friday, January 17, 2020
Christmas Break for Staff starts  -  Friday, December 20, 2019-
Christmas Break for Staff ends  -

Monday, December 23, 2019 - Friday, January 3, 2020

Work resumes  -  Monday, January 6, 2020

Departmental Board Meetings to consider First Semester Examination Results 

 Tuesday, January 7, 2020
Faculty Board Meetings to consider First Semester Examination Results  -  Thursday, January 9, 2020
Board of Postgraduate Studies Meeting to consider First Semester Examination Results  -  Friday, January 10, 2020
   Auditing of Examination Results
Faculties         -  Monday, January 13, 2020 -Tuesday, January 14, 2020
School of Postgraduate Studies  Wednesday, January 15, 2020
Deadline for Submission of First Semester Examination Results to Registrar  -  Friday, January 17, 2020
Special Academic Board Meeting to Consider First Semester Examination Results - Tuesday, January 21, 2020
SECOND SEMESTER – 161/2 WEEKS
 Arrival of Students  -  Saturday, January 18, 2020
Registration of All Students  -  Monday, January 20, 2020 -Wednesday, January 22, 2020
Lectures Begin  -  Thursday, January 23, 2020
Late Registration with Fine

 Thursday, January 23, 2020 -Friday, January 31, 2020

Registration of Students Closes  -  Friday, January 31, 2020
Registration for Special Re-sit Examinations  -  Monday, January 20, 2020 –

Friday, February 14, 2020

Deadline for Departments to Submit Lists of Registered Students by Courses to Academic Affairs Unit  Friday, February 7, 2020
Special Re-sit Examinations  -  Friday, February 21, 2020 - Friday, February 28, 2020
Closure of the University  -

Monday, March 16, 2020 – Friday, June 12, 2020

Re-opening of the University for final year students  -

Monday, June 15, 2020

Assessment of Course Delivery  -

Monday, July 6, 2020 –Friday, July 10, 2020

Second Semester Examinations  -

Monday, July 13, 2020 – Friday, July 24, 2020

Students Depart  - Saturday, July 25, 2020

Departmental Board Meetings to considerSecond Semester Examination Results

 - Monday, August 10, 2020

Faculty Board Meetings to consider Second Semester Examination Results

  Wednesday, August 12, 2020

Board of Postgraduate Studies Meeting to consider Second Semester Examination Results

 - Thursday, August 13, 2020
   Auditing of Examination Results
  • Faculties
 -

Monday, August 17, 2020 – Tuesday, August 18, 2020

  • School of Postgraduate Studies
 - Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Deadline for submission of Examination Results to Registrar

 - Monday, August 24, 2020

Special Academic Board Meeting to consider Second Semester Examination Results

 - Thursday, August 27, 2020
 CONGREGATION    Saturday, September 19, 2020

M. K. Okrah
Registrar

 

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This is a two year (4-semester) programme run by the Department of Geological Engineering. The programme aims at addressing the needs of middle level personnel in drilling for mineral/oil exploration, geotechnical and hydrogeological establishments. The successful candidate should be competent to take up jobs in the mining, oil, hydrogeological and allied industries and be able to design, operate, work in a team and supervise drilling operations under all conditions as well as have knowledge in using modern drilling equipment.



Computer Science and Engineering

Programmes Offered:

General Drilling Diploma


Department Contact Information
Department:
  Geological Engineering
Phone Number:
  +233 (0) 362 21139
Postal Address:
  P O Box 237, Tarkwa, Ghana
Email Address:
  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Website:
  http://www.umat.edu.gh

Programme Description

The Diploma in General Drilling programme is to address the need of middle level personnel in drilling for mineral/oil exploration, geotechnical and hydrogeological establishment.

Objectives of the Programme

  • Diplomates competent to take up jobs in the mining, oil, hydrogeological and allied industries
  • Confident drillers who can design, operate, work in a team and supervise drilling operations under all conditions.
  • Diplomates equipped with knowledge in using modern drilling equipment.

Programme Admission Requirement

Applicants must satisfy any of the following:

  1. WASSCE/SSCE credits in Integrated Science, Core Mathematics, English Language, and credits in the following elective subjects: Physics, Mathematics plus Chemistry or Technical Drawing or Metal Work or Applied Electricity or Electronics.
  2. General Certificate of Education (GCE) Ordinary Level credits in five (5) subjects including English Language, Chemistry, Physics, and Mathematics; and General Certificate of Education (GCE) Advanced Level passes in Chemistry, Physics, and Mathematics.
  3. City and Guilds of London Institute Part III Certificate or its equivalent in either Mechanical, Automobile, or Electrical Engineering.
  4. Holders of Certificate of Proficiency in General Drilling (one year course) from University of Mines and Technology or a recognised institution are eligible.
  5. Mature Applicants should be at least 25 years of age and should have any of the following:

 

  • GCE Ordinary Level Certificate with credits or SSCE with passes in five subjects including English Language and Mathematics plus experience in the relevant area of study.
  • City and Guilds of London Institute Part II Certificate or its equivalent plus experience in the relevant area of study.

Matured applicants will be selected after passing an interview to be conducted by the Department.
vi)    Foreign Applicants with equivalent certificates and grades are eligible.

Assessment Requirements:
Assessment of students shall involve:

  • Continuous assessment made up of records of attendance to lectures, exercises, laboratory work and field work (40 %); and
  • End of Semester Examinations (60 %)

Requirements for Graduation:
Candidates must:

  • Pass all required courses;
  • Achieve a minimum of 73 credits;
  • Obtain Cumulative Weighted Average (CWA) mark of 50 % and above; and
  • Complete a supervised project work in the Final Year.

 

YEAR ONE
SEMESTER ONE
Course No. Subject T P C
GL 121
GL 123
GL 125
GL 127
GL 129
GL 131
GL 133
GL 135
GL 137
Trigonometry and Calculus
Physical and Structural Geology
Land Surveying
Technical and Engineering Drawing
Internal Combustion Engine
Exploratory Drilling and Safety
Basic French 1
Communication Skills
Field Trip - Reverse Circulation Drilling
2
2
2
1
1
2
1
2
0
2
1
2
3
3
4
1
1
1
3
2
3
2
2
3
1
2
1
Totals
13 18 19
 
YEAR ONE
SEMESTER TWO
Course No. Subject T P C
GL 122
GL 124
GL 126
GL 128
GL 130
GL 132
GL 134
GL 136
GL 138
CE 172
CE 172
CE 172
Statistics & Probability
Strength of Materials
Mineralogy and Petrology
Introduction to Computing
Hydraulic Systems
Water Well Drilling
Technical Report Writing
Basic French II
Field Trip - Water Well Drilling
Programming in C++
Programming in C++
Programming in C++
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
2
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
Totals
15 11 18

 

YEAR TWO
SEMESTER ONE
Course No. Subject T P C
GL 221
GL 223
GL 225
GL 227
GL 229
GL 231
GL 233
GL 235
GL 237
Percussive Drilling
Rig Maintenance
Pneumatics
Literature in English
Elements of Mining and Rock Fragmentation
Hydrogeology
Basic Electricity
Entrepreneurial Skills
Field Trip - Core Drilling
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
0
1
3
1
0
2
1
1
1
1
2
3
2
1
3
2
2
2
1
Totals
15 11 18
 
YEAR TWO
SEMESTER TWO
Course No. Subject T P C
GL 222
GL 224
GL 226
GL 228
GL 230
GL 232
GL 234
GL 236
Rock and Soil Mechanics
Orientation Drilling
Project Work
Rock and Mineral Deposits of Ghana
Seminar
Managerial Skills
Environmental Management
Training on Oil Rig
2
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
2
3
8
2
2
1
1
1
3
2
3
3
2
2
2
1
Totals
12 21 18


YEAR ONE SEMESTER ONE

GL 121 Trigonometry and Calculus (2, 2, 3)

Trigonometry
Introduction: The general angle; the trigonometrical ratios of angles of any magnitude; trigonometrical ratios of 30º, 45º, 60º; Graphs of  ,  ,

Trigonometrical identities: the formulae for  ,  ,  ; the double angle formulae; the factor formulae; the Sine rule, the Cosine rule, area of triangle, radians, solving trigonometrical equations.

Calculus
Limits; differentiation of a composite function; implicit differentiation; maxima and minima; integration as the inverse of differentiation; application of integration to: trigonometry, polynomials, and exponential functions, areas and volumes; Integration techniques: integration by substitution, by parts and by resolution into partial fractions.

GL 123 Physical and Structural Geology (2, 1, 2)
Various disciplines in geology. The rock cycle, strata and geological time scale. Internal structure of the earth, the solar system, plate tectonics, weathering, soils, mass wasting.
Primary and secondary structures: bedding; cross bedding; graded bedding, ripple marks; desiccation cracks, sole marking, pillow lavas load cast; unconformities, folds, joints, faults, cleavages and schistosities.

GL 125 Land Surveying (2, 2, 3)
General surveying procedures and operations. Compass surveying and application in horizontal distance measurements and obstacles in chaining. Vertical control (levelling) and applications. Theodolite and applications. Traversing and computation. Modern positioning systems (electronic and satellite). Setting out and orientation of drill hole positions.

GL 127 Technical and Engineering Drawing (1, 3, 2)
Construction of lines, angles, regular polygons and general loci, first and third angle orthogonal projections. Sectional views and standard conventions of sectional views. Curves of intersections of various planes and solids, development of various solids like cylinders and spheres.

GL 129 Internal Combustion Engines (1, 3, 2)
Engine calculations. Energy conversion process. Fuel injection equipment. Fault finding - loss of power, engine knocks, diesel knock, detonation, warning, devices, fault, causes, remedies. Cooling System - liquid cooling, air cooling, thermosiphon, cooling, pressurised pump-assisted cooling, thermostats. Lubrication System. Power chart.

Internal Combustion Engines – cylinder compression test, cylinder leakage test, calibration and phasing test, exhaust gas analysis.

GL 131 Exploratory Drilling (2, 4, 3)
History of drilling, principles of drilling, drilling methods, main uses of diamond drill, general description of diamond drill, mechanical features of a diamond drill, core care and handling.

Drill tools and accessories: diamond bits, reaming shell, core barrels, rods, casings, pump, overburden, drill techniques, fluids for mud application, vibration, borehole deviation and survey.

GL 133 Basic French I (1, 1, 1)
Etablir l’Identité de quelqu’un. Entrer en contact avec le monde francophone. Savoir décrire les activités et les situer dans le temps. Savoir décrire sa famille et les liens familiaux. Etudier la santé et les sports.

GL 135 Communication Skills (2, 1, 2)
Introduction to communication. Communication in organisations. Listening skills. Note-taking and note-making. Reading skills. Writing skills. Avoiding common grammatical errors.

GL 137 Field Trip - Reverse Circulation Drilling (0, 1, 1)
Field trip to reverse circulation drilling operation: students will be expected to present reports to be assessed for credits.

YEAR ONE SEMESTER TWO
GL 122 Statistics and Probability (2, 1, 2)
Collection of data, descriptive analysis of data. Numerical descriptive measures - measures of central tendency, the mean, median and mode. Measures of dispersion - the range, the mean, deviation, the variance or standard deviation, the coefficient of variation, measurement of positions and shapes.

Events, sample space, definition of measure of probability of events, conditional probability and independent events, some basic laws and rules in probability, Bayes’ theorem, permutation and combination, probability distribution.

GL 124 Strength of Materials (2, 1, 2)
Mechanical properties of materials, simple stresses, temperature stresses, shear stresses, torsional shear stresses, beams; shear force and bending moments, bending stress in beams deflection beams, complex stresses, two dimensional stress, Mohr’s stress circle.

GL 126 Mineralogy and Petrology (2, 2, 3)
Crystallography: formation, classification, description of crystals; seven crystal systems, stereographic projections, twinned crystals. Physical properties of minerals.
Classification of minerals. Mineral Chemistry. Polymorphism, pseudomorphism, noncrystalline minerals.

Sedimentary rock formation, composition, classification, textures and description. Igneous Rock formation, composition, structures, textures and description. Metamorphic Rocks: factors and types of metamorphism, metamorphic zones and facies. Textures and structures. Classification, description and study of important metamorphic rocks.

GL 128 Introduction to Computing (2, 1, 2)
Introduction to computers, windows operating system, internet usage, word processing using MS word, spreadsheet using MS excel.

GL 130 Hydraulic Systems (2, 2, 3)
Basic principles of hydraulics (hydrostatic and hydrodynamics), properties of hydraulic fluids, filters and filtration, hydraulic pumps (construction, sizing and selection), control of hydraulic systems, actuators (linear and rotary), hydraulic reservoirs and accumulators, seals and packing, hydraulic pipes, hoses, and fittings, basic hydraulic circuits; hydraulic system maintenances, repairs and reconditioning.

GL 132 Water Well Drilling (2, 1, 2)
Well types, well drilling methods, environmental consideration, siting of drill holes, casings, methods and techniques of water well development, problems associated with water well supplies, types of hand pumps, preparation of concrete pad, design of screen types for basement formation, water level testing, mechanised borehole.

GL 134 Technical Report Writing and Presentations (2, 1, 2,)
Elements of technical writing. Writing of curriculum vitae (CV), minutes and reports. Career skills. Email communication. Presentation skills.

GL 136 Basic French II (1, 1, 1)
Les déplacements (I). Les déplacements (II). Les achats. Etudier la vie universitaire. Etudier l’art culinaire.

GL 138 Field Trip - Water Well Drilling (0, 1, 1)
Field trip to water well drilling operation. Students will be expected to present reports upon which they will be assessed for their credits.

YEAR TWO SEMESTER ONE
GL 221 Percussive Rock Drilling (2, 1, 2)
Introduction to rotary air blast drilling. Tools for rotary drilling, hydraulic rock drills: top hammer and DTH, pneumatic rock drills, principle of percussive drilling, setting parameters, and production drilling.

GL 223 Rig Maintenance (2, 3, 3)
Fault finding/inspection, diagnoses before repairs, minor repairs, major repairs, top overhaul, decarbonising and valve grinding, engine washing equipment, washing chemicals, engine, dismantling procedures, engine reconditioning, use of liners, wet liners installation procedures, dry liners installation and equipment, engine crankshaft reconditioning.

GL 225 Pneumatics (2, 1, 2)
Basic Thermodynamics, First Law and Second Law, non-flow and flow equations, application to closed and open systems, types of compressors; (reciprocating rotary, centrifugal and axial) drivers; accessories; lubrication system; control valves; actuators; piping, hoses and fittings; air tools; air filters and water separators; selection and siting compressors; air distribution system; safety and maintenance.

GL 227 Literature in English (1, 0, 1)
Introduction to literature. Analysis, interpretation and appreciation of literature: prose, drama and poetry. Selected texts (African and non-African classics).

GL 229 Elements of Mining and Rock Fragmentation (2, 2, 3)
Basic introduction to underground and surface mining terminologies: description of various operations in underground and surface mining - drilling, blasting, mucking, supporting, stoping, ventilation, benching, stripping, reclamation, including technology and equipment. Introduction to underground and surface mining methods; elements of mine ventilation; Sampling and resource evaluation; materials handling equipment; explosives - types of explosives, their properties and areas of use. Methods of ground fragmentation: drilling and blasting, environmental impact of mining.

GL 231 Hydrogeology (2, 1, 2)
The Hydrologic Cycle: precipitation, evaporation, runoff and stream flow measurements.
Properties of aquifers: porosity and permeability of various types of rocks. Groundwater recharge: hydrologic horizons, condensation theory, infiltration theory, aquifer types and properties, groundwater dynamics, hydraulic head, hydraulic gradient, Darcy’s law, hydraulic conductivity, flow lines and equipotential lines Well installation, drilling methods, well design, well development and aquifer tests

GL 233 Basic Electricity (2, 1, 2)
Circuit laws. Electrostatics and capacitance. Electromagnetism. Magnetic Circuits. Alternating Voltage and Current.

GL 235 Entrepreneurial Skills (2, 1, 2)
Introduction to Business Entrepreneurship: Forms of business ownership. Financial management. Insurance. Industrial relations and Labour relations.

GL 237 Field Trip - Core Drilling (0, 1, 1)
Field trip to Core Drilling Operation: students will be expected to present reports upon which they will be assessed for their credits.

YEAR TWO SEMESTER TWO
GL 222 Rock and Soil Mechanics (2, 2, 3)

Scope of rock mechanics. Rock strength and deformability. Engineering rock mass classification. Excavation support systems. Determination of moisture content, density, porosity, RQD and UCS. Origin and classification of soils. Phase relationships. Permeability of soils. Compaction of soils. Site investigation. Determination of moisture content, Atterberg limits. Particle size analysis, soil density, constant and falling head permeability.

GL 224 Orientation Drilling (1, 3, 2)
Mechanical hole making methods, cable tool drill string components, types of cable drill rigs, rotary drilling, auger drilling, prime movers, cable tool operation.

GL 226 Project Work (1, 8, 3)
Data obtained either during the previous industrial attachment or from elsewhere is processed and analysed/interpreted and presented as project work.

GL 228 Rock and Mineral Deposits of Ghana (2, 2, 3)
Processes of formation of mineral deposits. Magmatic concentration of deposits. Alteration, hydrothermal and replacement deposits. Sedimentary and residual deposits and supergene enrichment. Mineral fuels and traps. Industrial Mineral formation and properties. Classification of the various non-metallics and aggregates in Ghana.
Statigraphy of the Birimian. Proterozoic ganitoids. Distribution, origin of gold, manganese, etc. in the Birimain and Tarkwaian. Dahomeyan, Togo, Buem and Voltaian Systems. Accraian and Sekondian Series.

GL 230 Seminar (1, 3, 2)
Students are either given current topics on drilling operations or are made to discuss and present an update of their project works at a forum.

GL 232 Managerial Skills (2, 1, 2)
Introduction to management. Planning and organising. Case studies to demonstrate the concept of management in industry.

GL 234 Training on Oil Rig (1, 1, 1)
Components of oil rigs, oil drilling techniques, overview of site preparation and drilling, removal of drill pipe, casing, dangers of oil drilling, safety measures at drilling site, technical services, oil spills and environmental concerns.

GL 236 Environmental Management (2, 1, 2)
Waste generation, land pollution, air and water pollution, noise pollution, green house effect, ozone depletion, solid waste management, water resource management, land rehabilitation.


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The Department runs a 4-Year Bachelor of Science Degree programme in Environmental and Safety Engineering.   The aim of the Department is to provide a broad-based education and training in safety and environmental issues that will enable graduates to address environmental and safety engineering challenges in Ghana and elsewhere. 
The programme is composed of taught courses, seminars, fieldtrips, report writing and laboratory work. The taught courses are assessed largely through quizzes, class tests, homework and an end of semester examination.The Curriculum aims at providing knowledge of the Practical and essential principles of water, soil and air management, Safety Management, Health hazards, Hydrograph Analysis, water and air Modeling Systems, Waste Treatment Innovations and Engineering Economics.


Graduates of the Department will be equipped with the skill to identify, model and solve environmental and safety engineering problems.  Graduates will also be equipped with Methods of Controlling Hazards and Risk at work places.  They will also be able to know and prepare Energy-efficient Buildings and Design, Land use and Community Planning and Social Responsibility Strategies as well as be able to prepare and present engineering reports and apply relevant environmental principles to manage organizations and maintain cordial human relations.

The Department has strong academic staff with specialties in the fields of Environmental Chemistry, Environmental Process Engineering, Ergonomics and Stress Managements, Occupational Health and Safety, Meteorology, Risk Management and Hazard Control Systems.  Individual lecturers are heavily involved in research in their respective fields.
The Department is endowed with adequate laboratory facilities and resources to undertake research and outreach activities.  There exists contact with mining and allied industries that enable industrial attachments and fieldtrips to take place. Students are therefore always able to relate the practical with theory for effective understanding for a successful career.


 

BSc ENVIRONMENTAL AND SAFETY ENGINEERING

    ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:

       i.            Applicants with SSSCE and WASSCE Certificates

         Applicant must have credits in the following subjects:

Credits in Core Subjects

Credits in Elective Subjects

English Language

Mathematics

Integrated Science

Physics

Mathematics

Chemistry


  ii.            Applicants with Ordinary and Advanced Level certificates

Candidates with GCE ordinary level must have passes in English, Mathematics, Additional Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry. Applicants with GCE advanced level Certificates must have credit passes in Mathematics Physics and Chemistry

   iii.            Mature Candidates

a.       Candidates must have attained 25 years of age.

b.       Candidates must have credits in 5 WASSCE/SSSCE subjects including English Language and Mathematics or passes in five subjects at SC/GCE Ordinary Level including English Language, Mathematics and a Science Subject.

c.       In addition the candidates must have had relevant working experience.

d.       Candidate must also pass an interview conducted at the Department.

 

 


DEPARTMENT CONTACT INFORMATION
Department:
  Environmental & Safety Engineering (BSc)
Phone Number:
  +233 (0) +233 3123 20324/20280
Postal Address:
  P O Box 237, Tarkwa, Ghana
Email Address:
  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Website:
  http://www.umat.edu.gh

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

 

YEAR ONE SEMESTER ONE      
Course Code Course Name T P C
ES 141 Basic French I 1 1 1
ES 151 Applied Electricity 2 2 3
ES 153 Linear Algebra & Trigonometry 2 2 3
ES 155 Technical Drawing  1 3 2
ES 157 Communication Skills I 2 1 2
ES 159 Introduction to Computing 1 2 2
ES 161 Physical and Structural Geology  2 1 2
ES 167 Basic Mechanics 2 2 3
ES 171 Principles of Environmental Engineering 2 1 2
Total   15 15 20

 

YEAR ONE SEMESTER TWO       
Course Code Course Name T P C
ES 142 Basic French II 1 1 1
ES 150 Calculus 2 1 2
ES 152 Strength of Materials 2 2 3
ES 154 Physical and Analytical Chemistry 2 1 2
ES 156 Engineering Drawing 2 2 3
ES 158 Communication Skills II 2 1 2
ES 160 Mineralogy and Petrology 2 2 3
ES 162 Applied Electronics 2 1 2
ES 172 Introduction to Ecology and Biodiversity 2 1 2
Total   17 12 20

 

 

 
 
 
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The Computer Science and Engineering Department currently runs a four-year Bachelor of Science (BSc) degree programme. The programme is designed to provide students with a firm grounding in the concepts of Computer Science and Engineering and related courses to meet the requirements of educational institutions and industry. A graduate from the department is expected to have a broad knowledge in a fairly large area in Computing and Engineering and their applications.

The Computer Science and Engineering Department has qualified and experienced lecturers.
The Computer Science and Engineering Department at UMaT should be the preferred choice of candidates desirous of studying and applying Computer Science and Engineering in their everyday life because of the wide range of subjects covered.
The successful graduate will find employment in the Banking and Financial sectors, Mining and allied industries, Educational and Research institutions, just to mention a few.

 


Computer Science and Engineering

Programmes Offered:

Computer Science and EngineeringBSc


Department Contact Information
Department:
  Computer Science and Engineering
Phone Number:
  +233 (0) 362 21139
Postal Address:
  P O Box 237, Tarkwa, Ghana
Email Address:
  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Website:
  http://www.umat.edu.gh

Programme Description

Computer science is the study of computer software whereas computer engineering is the study, design and analysis of computer hardware and software. Computer science differs from computer engineering in that, for the computer scientist, strategies for the theory of software development are of primary importance and for computer engineers, computer hardware is a principal concern and, in creating software, they tend to focus more on applying and merging techniques. The programme aims at providing firm grounding in basic concepts of both Computer Science and Engineering disciplines and related courses to meet the requirements for the Information, and Communication Technology (ICT) arena and allied industries.


Programme Admission Requirement BSc
For admission, candidates must have:

1. Passes in THREE CORE SUBJECTS at Senior High School (SHS) LEVEL in English, Mathematics, and Integrated Science AND passes in THREE SCIENCE ELECTIVES in Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics.
OR
2. Passes in the GCE ORDINARY-LEVEL in English, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics and GCE ADVANCED Level passes in Physics, Chemistry, and Mathematics.

WASSCE-SSSCE Conversion

 

YEAR ONE
SEMESTER ONE
Course No. Subject T P C
CE 151
CE 155
CE 157
CE 159
CE 171
CE 167
CE 169
Applied Electricity
Technical Drawing
Communication Skills I
Introduction to Computing
Introduction to Computer Science and Engineering
Basic Mechanics
Linear Algebra
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
3
1
1
2
3
3
2
2
2
3
3
Totals
13 12 18
 
YEAR ONE
SEMESTER TWO
Course No. Subject T P C
CE 152
CE 156
CE 158
CE 164
CE 166
CE 168
CE 172
CE 174
Strength of Materials
Engineering Drawing
Communication Skills II
Basic Electronics
Calculus
Basic Material Science
Circuit Theory
Programming in C++
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
4
1
2
2
1
3
4
2
3
2
3
3
2
3
3
Totals
14 18 21

 

YEAR TWO
SEMESTER ONE
Course No. Subject T P C
CE 251
CE 265
CE 271
CE 273
CE 275
CE 277
CE 279
Literature in English I
Differential Equations
Data Structure and Algorithms
Computer Architecture
Electronics I
Programming with Visual Basic
Introduction to Data Base Systems
1
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
4
2
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
Totals
12 15 19
 
YEAR TWO
SEMESTER TWO
Course No. Subject T P C
CE 252
CE 260
CE 266
CE 278
CE 270
CE 272
CE 274
CE 276
Literature in English II
Mathematical Analysis
Signals and Systems
Introduction to Microprocessors
Fieldtrip and Technical Report Writing I
Electronics II
User Interface and Software Design
Software Engineering
1
2
2
2
0
2
2
2
1
2
2
1
4
2
2
2
1
3
3
2
1
3
3
3
Totals
13 16 19
 
YEAR THREE
SEMESTER ONE
Course No. Subject T P C
CE 361
CE 363
CE 365
CE 375
CE 377
CE 371
CE 373
Probability and Statistics
Numerical Analysis
Environmental Management
Operating Systems
Design Practices in Computer Science
Embedded System Design
Object - Oriented Programming with C++
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
Totals
14 12 19
 
YEAR THREE
SEMESTER TWO
Course No. Subject T P C
CE 352
CE 356
CE 374
CE 364
CE 380
CE 382
CE 372
CE 376
Public Relations
Fieldtrip and Technical Report Writing II
Data Communication and Computer Networks
Logic of Computer Science
Programming with Visual Basic
Simulation and Modelling
Web Programming
Digital Hardware Design
2
0
2
2
2
2
2
2
0
4
2
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
3
3
2
3
2
2
Totals
14 13 18

 

YEAR FOUR
SEMESTER ONE
Course No. Subject T P C
CE 451
CE 457
CE 459
CE 461
CE 471
CE 473
CE 475
Economic Development and Planning
Law of Contract and Tort
Operations Research
Principles of Economics
Industrial Electronics
Digital Signal and Image Processing
Artificial Intelligence
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
0
2
0
2
2
2
2
2
3
2
3
3
3
Totals
14 9 18
 
YEAR FOUR
SEMESTER TWO
Course No. Subject T P C
CE 450
CE 452
CE 454
CE 470
CE 472
CE 474
Project Work
Colloquium/Seminar
Business Entrepreneurship
Compiler Design
Network Principles and Computer Security
Introduction to Robotics
0
0
2
2
1
2
12
4
0
2
4
2
4
1
2
3
3
3
Totals
7 24 16

 

COURSE OUTLINE FOR
B.Sc. DEGREE PROGRAMME IN COMPUTER SCIENCE & ENGINEERING

YEAR ONE SEMESTER ONE

CE 151 Applied Electricity (2, 2, 3)
Circuit laws. Circuit theorems. Electrostatics. Electromagnetism. Magnetic circuits. Inductance. Alternating voltage and current. Signal waveforms. Introduction to electrical machines: transformers, Direct Current (DC) machines, induction machines and synchronous machines.

CE 155 Technical Drawing (2, 2, 3)
Lettering with inclined and vertical strokes. Word spacing and compositions. Construction of lines, angles, regular polygons and general loci. First and third angle orthogonal projections. Dimensioning, limits, fits and tolerance.

CE 157 Communication Skills I (2, 1, 2)
Tools, methods and systems of communication. Pre-writing and writing skills. Reading skills. Conventions and usages. Co-ordination and parallelism. Ambiguity.

CE 159 Introduction to Computing (1, 3, 2)
Introduction to Personal Computers (PCs). Windows operating system. Internet usage. Word processing using Microsoft (MS) Word. Spreadsheet using Microsoft (MS) Excel.

CE 167 Basic Mechanics (2, 1, 2)
Introductory concepts of engineering mechanics: involving basic principles in statics and dynamics with simple applications. Simple machines and conservation laws. Trusses.

CE 169 Linear Algebra (2, 2, 3)
Matrix algebra: determinants. Systems of linear equations and their solutions by matrix methods. Consistency of equations. Homogeneous systems of equations. Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors. Vector algebra: Scalar products. Vector products. Scalar triple products. Vector triple products. Geometrical applications of vectors. Complex algebra: the Argand diagram. De Moivre’s theorem and its applications (solution of polynomial equations, summation of series). Sequence and series.

CE 171 Introductions to Computer Science and Engineering (2, 1, 2)
Introduction to the fields of computer science and engineering. Current and future trends and challenges in various fields of computing. Social, ethical and economical issues related to computing technology. Introduction to problem-solving through programming. The algorithmic concepts, program control flow, and using prewritten functions. Exploration of career and professional development opportunities.

YEAR ONE SEMESTER TWO

CE 152 Strength of Materials (2, 1, 2)
Mechanical properties of materials. Simple stresses. Temperature stresses. Shear stresses. Torsional shear stresses. Beams: shear force and bending moments, bending stress in beams. Complex stresses: two dimensional stress. Mohr’s stress circle.

CE 156 Engineering Drawing (2, 2, 3)
Using Computer Aided Design (CAD) software to do the following: sectional views and standard conventions of sectional views. Curves of intersection of various planes and solids. Development of various solids like cylinders and spheres. Assembly drawings from both exploded views and working drawing views.

CE 158 Communication Skills II (2, 1, 2)
Supporting and developing sentences. Forms of discourse. Inductive and deductive reasoning. Registers. Editing. The use of footnotes. References. Newspapers and journals. Plagiarism.

CE 164 Basic Electronics (2, 2, 3)
Atomic structure. Semiconductor devices. Bipolar transistors. Rectification. Thyristors. Photo cells. Field Effect Transistors (FET).

CE 166 Calculus (2, 2, 3)
Differentiation: logarithmic and parametric differentiation. Differentiation of inverse trigonometric functions. Applications to maxima and minima. Leibnitz’s formula for nth (repeated) differentiation of a product. Indeterminate forms. Rolle’s theorem. Mean value theorem. Techniques of integration: integration by parts, reduction formulae. Improper integrals. Functions of several variables. Partial differentiation. Total derivatives. Langrange multipliers. Gradient. Divergence and curl of vectors.

CE 168 Basic Material Science (2, 1, 2)
Materials and properties. Bonding and atomic structure. The crystalline state. Structural disorder. Phase equilibra. Shaping of materials. Iron and steel. Brief treatment of non-ferrous metals. Thermoplastics, Thermosetting of materials and ceramics. Behaviour of materials in service.

CE 172 Circuit Theory (2, 2, 3)
Network theorems to Alternating Current (AC) Networks: network topology. Graph or network. Trees: node voltage and current equations. Two port networks: interconnection of networks, application of interconnection rules, loaded two ports, reciprocity and symmetry. Multiport networks: network equations. n-terminal networks. Two port devices: the gyrator. Laboratory work I: circuit practice, electromagnetism and the magnetic circuit, circuit laws and bridge circuits.

CE 174 Programming in C++ (1, 4, 3)
Introduction to C programming. Fundamental data types and storage classes. Operators and expressions. Standard C/C++ preprocessor. Standard C/C++ library and conditional program execution. Program loops and iteration. Modular programming. Arrays. Structures. Pointers to objects. Unions. Controlling devices. Operating system interaction. Mouse and graphic programming. Lists, trees, string, queues and stacks.

YEAR TWO SEMESTER ONE

CE 251 Literature in English I (1, 1, 1)
Introduction to literary terms and devices. Specific texts: prose, drama, poetry. Vocabulary and language use. Literature as a reflection of contemporary way of life or society (the text as mirrors). Literature and morality (the text as examples). Literature as a form of entertainment. African writers series.

CE 265 Differential Equations (2, 2, 3)
Ordinary differential equations. First order equations. Second order equations with constant coefficients. Laplace transforms and z-transforms and their application to solution of ordinary differential equations.

CE 271 Data Structures and Algorithm (2, 2, 3)
Review of basic data structures and their realization in object oriented environment. The following topics will be covered with emphasis on formal analysis and design: dynamic data structures, 2-3 trees, red-black trees, binary heaps, binomial and Fibonacci heaps, skip lists, universal hashing. Data structures for maintaining ranges, intervals and disjoint sets with applications. Basic algorithmic techniques like dynamic programming and divide- and-conquer. Sorting algorithms with analysis. Integer sorting algorithms with analysis. Integer selection, Graph algorithms like Depth First Search (DFS) with applications. Minimum Spanning Tree (MSTs) and shortest paths.

CE 273 Computer Architecture (2, 2, 3)
Subsystems of a computer. Instructions and their formats. Assembly programming. Performance metrics. Performance comparison. Information representation. Integer and floating point arithmetic. Processor data path design. Control unit design. Microprogramming. Performance improvement with pipelining. Memory organization: cache and virtual memory. Input/output organization, interrupts and Dynamic Memory Allocation (DMA).

CE 275 Electronics I (2, 2, 3)
Differential gain and output gain stages. Operational amplifiers and their application to analogue computers. Active filters. Signal generation. Voltage and switching regulators. Oscillators, feedback and stability.

CE 277 Programming with Java (2, 1, 2)
In-depth treatment of computer programming using JAVA. Solution of problems related to a variety of disciplines. An introduction to the basic concepts of software and hardware. Students will develop a variety of stand-alone applications and applets.

CE 279 Introduction to Data Base Systems (2, 2, 3)
The world of database systems. The Entity Relational (E-R) model, the three database models, representation and evaluation of relationship. The relational database model. Functional dependencies. Multi-valued and joint dependency. Normalization theory. Concurrency control in relational databases. Object-oriented data models. The database language Structured Query Language (SQL): constraints and triggers in Structured Query Language (SQL), system aspects of Structured Query Language (SQL). Object-oriented query languages. Extensible Markup Language (XML) databases.

YEAR TWO SEMESTER TWO

CE 252 Literature in English II (1, 1, 1)
Reading and appreciation. Literary terms. Specific texts: prose, drama, poetry. Vocabulary and language use. Literature as a reflection of contemporary way of life or society (the text as mirrors). Literature and morality (the text as examples). Literature as a form of entertainment. Shakespearean and modern classics.

CE 260 Mathematical Analysis (2, 2, 3)
Partial differential equations. The wave equation. Heat conduction equation and Laplace’s equation. Solutions by separation of variables. Legendre polynomials. Convergence of series. Power series. Taylor’s and Maclaurin’s series. Fourier series. Multiple integrals. Double and triple integrals. Line, surface and volume integrals. Green’s theorem.

CE 272 Electronics II (2, 2, 3)
Digital devices and circuits. Memories. Combinational systems. Synchronous and asynchronous sequential systems. Design example.

CE 266 Signals and Systems (2, 1, 2)
An introduction to signals and systems. Formalizing signals and systems. Continuous-time and discrete-time Linear Time-Invariant (LTI) systems in detail.  The Laplace transform for continuous time signals and systems. System realization through block-diagram representation and system inter-connection. The sampling theorem and its implications. Applications of signal and system theory.

CE 270 Fieldtrip and Technical Report Writing I (0, 4, 1)
Fieldtrips to areas of interest. Students will be expected to present reports upon which they will be assessed for their credits.

CE 274 User Interface and Software Design (2, 2, 3)
Evaluation, design and programming of user interface systems. Fundamentals of human cognition, system characteristics, and the interaction between humans and systems. Usability methods and user/task-centered design. Tools for designing and building user interfaces with emphasis on rapid applications development.

CE 276 Software Engineering (2, 2, 3)
Concepts and techniques relevant to production of large software systems: structured programming, requirements specification and analysis. Top-down design and development. Information hiding. Abstraction. Modularity. Object-oriented techniques. Separate compilation. Configuration management. Program libraries design patterns. Unified Modeling Language (UML) documentation. Validation. Quality assurance, safety, testing and test case generation. Software metrics. Cost analysis and estimation. Manpower and time management. Organization and management of large software design projects.

CE 278 Introduction to Microprocessors and Digital Control System (2, 2, 3)
Microprocessor architecture. Instruction set. Interfacing input and output devices. Interrupts. and 8051 Micro-controller. Basic concepts and terminologies of control system. Introduction and mathematical description of systems. Continuous and discrete time system. Quality control system processes. Control settings. Digital implementation of control system. Automation and controls

YEAR THREE SEMESTER ONE

CE 361 Probability and Statistics (2, 1, 2)
Introduction to probability. Random variables. Discrete and continuous distribution. Regression analysis and correlation. Methods of estimation. Confidence intervals. Test of hypothesis. Principles of reliability.

CE 363 Numerical Analysis (2, 1, 2)
Error analysis. Interpolation. Iterative methods of solving systems of linear and non-linear equations. Numerical solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations. Application of computer programming.

CE 365 Environmental Management (2, 2, 3)
Mine atmosphere. Air parameters. Mine gases. Mine dust. Atmospheric air. Air pollution. Heat in mines. Mine climate. Thermal stress environment. Thermal indices. Mine fires. Water quality and water pollution. Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). Use of instruments for measuring air, gases, dust and thermal index.

CE 371 Embedded System Designs (2, 2, 3)
Introduction to embedded systems hardware needs. Interrupts basics Interrupt Service Routines (ISR). Survey of software architectures. Inter task communication. Message queue, mailboxes and pipes. Timer functions. Events interrupt routines in a Real-Time Operating Systems (RTOS) environment. Embedded system software design using an Real-Time Operating Systems (RTOS) hard real-time and soft real-time system principles, Task division, need of interrupt routines, shared data. Embedded software development tools. Debugging techniques.

CE 373 Object Oriented Programming with C++ (2, 2, 3)
Object oriented paradigm & C++ at a glance. Classes and objects. Object initialization and cleanup. Dynamic objects. Operator overloading. Inheritance. Virtual functions. Generic programming with templates. Streams computation with streams. Stream computation with files. Exception handling.

CE 375 Operating Systems (2, 2, 3)
Functions of operating systems. Layered architecture basic concepts: interrupt architecture, system calls and notion of process and threads. Synchronization and protection issues. Scheduling: memory management including virtual memory and paging techniques. Input-output architecture and device management. File systems: distributed file systems. Multitasking. Case studies of UNIX, Windows NT, Linux. Design and implementation of small operating systems.

CE 377 Design Practices in Computer Science (2, 2, 3)
Basic design methodology: introduction to the steps involved. Familiarization with software practices, tools and techniques. Software project involving conceptualization, design, analysis,  implementation and testing using the tools and techniques learnt.

YEAR THREE SEMESTER TWO

CE 352 Public Relations (2, 0, 2)
Meaning, nature and scope of Public Relations (PR) as exhibited by its definition and distinction from other forms of communication. Planning PR programmes. The role PR plays in organizations and as to whether to set up a PR department or depend on the services of a PR consultant. Media and press relations. Case studies.

CE 356 Fieldtrip and Technical Report Writing II (0, 4, 1)
Fieldtrip to areas of interest. Students will be expected to present reports upon which they will be assessed for their credits.

CE 372 Web programming (1, 4, 3)
Web page design using modern tools. Development of web pages from layout to posting on the Internet. Website usability, accessibility, security, and ethics. Introduction to www development, accessibility issues, standards, and programming: emphasizing Extensible Markup Language (XML) technologies and cascading style sheets. Visual design principles and information architecture. Client-server and server-client programming and protocols. Development for adaptive technologies and mobile devices.

CE 374 Data Communication and Computer Networks (2, 2, 3)
Fundamentals of digital communications, including channel capacity, error rates, multiplexing, framing and synchronization. Broadcast network and multi-access protocols, including Carrier Sensible Multiple Access with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD). Data link protocols, network protocols including routing and congestion control, Internet Protocol (IP). Transport protocol including Transfer Control Protocol (TCP). Network application services and protocols including email, www, Domain Name Server (DNS). Network security and management.

CE 376 Digital Hardware Design (2, 1, 2)
Combinational circuit design using Medium Scale Integration/Large Scale Integration (MSI/LSI) and programmable logic modules. Iterative and tree networks. Sequential circuit design and implementation. Algorithmic state machine design. Asynchronous and pulse mode circuit design. Hardware description language and synthesis. Micro- program control design. Testing of digital systems. Introduction to hardware-software co-design.

CE 378 Logic of Computer Science (2, 1, 2)
Review of the principle of mathematical induction. The principle of structural induction. Review of boolean algebras. Syntax of propositional formulas. Truth and the semantics of propositional logic. Notions of satisfiability, validity and inconsistency. Deduction systems for propositional logic. Soundness and completeness of deduction systems. First order logic (FOL): syntax and semantics. Proof theory for FOL. Introduction to model theory. Completeness and compactness theorems. First order theories. Programming exercises will include representation and evaluation, conversion to normal-forms, tautology checking. Proof normalization. Resolution. Unification. Skolemization. Conversion to Horn-clauses. Binary-decision diagrams.

CE 380 Programming with Visual Basics (1, 4, 2)
Introduction to structure programming, design environment, controls, properties, programming, and applications of Visual Basic programming language. Utilizes Visual Basics, a general-purpose language but also emphasizes problem-solving solutions and methods for variable applications. Students are introduced to object-oriented and event-driven programming. Topics include forms, events, properties, syntax and file processing. Problems related to a variety of disciplines are solved.

CE 382 Simulation and Modelling (2, 2, 3)
Fundamentals of modeling. Classification of simulation models. The simulation process. System investigation, model formulation, validation and translation. Time flow mechanisms. Design of computer simulation experiments. Simulation of complex discrete-event systems with applications in industrial and service organizations. Tactical planning and management aspects. Random variable generation and analysis.

YEAR FOUR SEMESTER ONE

CE 451 Economic Development and Planning (2, 1, 2)
Theories and concepts of development. Foreign aid, grants and investment. Techniques of economic development planning. Third world and economic development planning, with particular emphasis on Ghana.

CE 457 Law of Contract and Tort (2, 0, 2)
Law and legal system. Contract and conditions for valid contracts. Contracts and business organizations. Abrogation of contracts.

CE 459 Operations Research (2, 2, 3)
Application of the following operations research techniques in solving relevant problems: linear and integer programming, assignment and transportation problems. Decision analysis. Project scheduling methods: Critical Path Method, (CPM), Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT). Simulation techniques. Application of appropriate computer software.

CE 461 Principles of Economics (2, 0, 2)
Introduction to microeconomics. Demand and supply and price theory. Elasticities. Economies of scale. Optimal input combinations and cost functions. Perfect competition, monopoly, imperfect competition. Business organizations and securities. Introduction to macroeconomics. Functions of government. Measurement of national output and income. Money and banking.

CE 471 Industrial Electronics (2, 2, 3)
Design of amplifiers. FET amplifiers. Frequency response of wide-band/narrow-band amplifiers, Large signal (power) amplifiers (class A, B, AB, C etc.). Differential amplifiers and current sources. Op-Amps. Feedback and stability. Quasi-linear circuits: Phase-Locked-Loop (PLL) circuits, Integrated Circuit IC oscillators timers and circuits: frequency-to-voltage, voltage-to-frequency converters. Basic Programmer Logic Controller (PLC).

CE 473 Digital Signals and Image Processing (2, 2, 3)
Signal representation in time domain, Fourier transform, sampling theorem, linear time-invariant system, discrete convolution, z-transform, discrete Fourier transform, and discrete filter design. Introduction and digital image fundamentals. Image transforms. Image enhancement. Image restoration. Image compression. Image segmentation. Representation and description. Recognition and interpretation

CE 475 Artificial Intelligence (2, 1, 2)
Problem solving, search techniques, control strategies, game playing (minimax), reasoning, knowledge representation through predicate logic, rule-based systems semantic nets, frames, conceptual dependency formalism. Planning. Handling uncertainty: Bayesian networks, Dempster-Shafer theory, certainty factors. Fuzzy logic. Learning through neural nets: Back propagation, radial basis functions. Neural computational models: Hopfield nets, Boltzman machines. Logic Programming Language (PROLOG) programming.

YEAR FOUR SEMESTER TWO

CE 450 Project Work (0, 12, 4)
Selected project work under the supervision of an academic Senior Member.

CE 452 Colloquium/Seminar (0, 4, 1)
Student will prepare a paper on a selected topic and present it in a seminar under supervision.

CE 454 Business Entrepreneurship (2, 0, 2)
Forms of Business organization. Management of business enterprises. Budget preparation process. Management of working capital. Investment in asserts.

CE 470 Compiler Design (2, 2, 3)
Compilers and translators. Lexical and syntactic analysis: top-down and bottom up parsing techniques. Internal form of source programs. Semantic analysis, symbol tables, error detection and recovery, code generation and optimization. Type checking and static analysis. Algorithms and implementation techniques for type-checking code generation and optimization. Students will design and implement translators, static analysis, type-checking and optimization.

CE 472 Network Principles and Computer Security (2, 2, 3)
Fundamentals of computer network programming. Client-server programming. Concepts of computer network programming including the RPC procedure call, Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA), multicasts, and broadcasts. Overview of computer network theory and practice from a systems perspective: network infrastructure, local area network (LAN) protocols, wide area network (WAN) protocols, switching technologies, Internet Protocol (IP), Transmission Control Protocol (TCP), network security, and network configuration, design, and performance. Element of information security. Security issues and control. Cryptography methods of information security.

CE 474 Introduction to Robotics (2, 2, 3)
Discrete-time and quantized data control systems. Z-transform and state space methods. Principles of digital control. Digital controllers and components. Controller software. Industrial and robotic systems. Descriptions of 3D space, geometry of robotics manipulators. Transducers and interfacing.

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